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Billy Booth

UFO Causes Village in China to Disappear

By October 15, 2010

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According to Yahoo China, reports from China are stating that a UFO has caused a village to disappear. An episode from the "Twilight Zone?" No, this is a real report. How accurate it is remains to be seen.

We have all been watching the continuing reports of UFOs over China, but this one is truly one-step-beyond. Supposedly this strange event occurred on October 10, in the Qinling Mountains. The area does contain a pyramid, and a nuclear facility.

Check out the report at UFO Causes Village in China to Disappear, and be sure to comment.

Comments

October 15, 2010 at 8:51 am
(1) ufos says:

You are right. This really is one step beyond. Surely this can’t be real. or is it?

October 15, 2010 at 10:41 am
(2) Kevin says:

I’ve read where they are saying it is a hoax. Which I would lean toward for sure. I would like to see how they faked the light effect off in the distance on the video though. If it was cgi it was well played for sure. But there were no videos or pictures on the village that I could find and I would think if you have that kind of story you would show where the village used to be. I guess what I’m saying is the story just seems incomplete to me. That’s a pretty incredible story and you would need more than a video of a light and a story for people to buy it.

October 15, 2010 at 11:35 am
(3) Snake says:

So, what was that video of? A blue light? Wow, typical BS. Personally, my confidence of anything coming from a third world communist country is about zero.

October 15, 2010 at 2:55 pm
(4) Christopher says:

The best way to fake a blue light in the distance at night, is to turn on a blue light in the distance at night. Best CGI you can get.

October 15, 2010 at 5:00 pm
(5) Iole Dambrosio says:

Eskimo-Village Disappeared (Wikipedia & other sources)

An entire village of 2,000 men, women and children apparently disappeared in Alaska in November, 1930. “A fur trapper named Joe Labelle made his way on snow shoes to an Eskimo village on the shores of Lake Anjikuni in northern Canada. Labelle was familiar with the village, which he knew as a thriving fishing community of about 2,000 residents. When he arrived, however, the village was deserted. All of the huts and storehouses were vacant. He found one smoldering fire on which there was a pot of blackened stew. Labelle notified the authorities and an investigation was begun, and which turned up some bizarre findings: no footprints of any of the residents were found, if they had vacated the village; all of the Eskimos’ sled dogs were found buried under a 12-foot-high snow drift – they had all starved to death; all of the Eskimos’ food and provisions were found undisturbed in their huts. And there was one last unnerving discovery: the Eskimos’ ancestral graves had been emptied…”

October 15, 2010 at 5:04 pm
(6) iolanda dambrosio says:

Eskimo-Village Disappeared in 1930.

In November, 1930, a fur trapper named Joe Labelle made his way on snow shoes to an Eskimo village on the shores of Lake Anjikuni in northern Canada. Labelle was familiar with the village, which he knew as a thriving fishing community of about 2,000 residents. When he arrived, however, the village was deserted… and even the Eskimos’ ancestral graves had been emptied…

October 16, 2010 at 7:36 am
(7) COL8K4bBminus30 says:

I would have eaten or abducted the Stew instead I think as its burring brrr drrrrr shiver me timbers cold up there a ways :-)

October 16, 2010 at 6:31 pm
(8) Scott says:

“no footprints of any of the residents were found, if they had vacated the village; all of the Eskimos’ sled dogs were found buried under a 12-foot-high snow drift – they had all starved to death; all of the Eskimos’ food and provisions were found undisturbed in their huts”

Iole that’s interesting. But we have to careful about good stories like that since the world is full of story tellers. Here’s something else I found on another website…

“The story about the disappearance in the 1930′s of an Inuit village near Lake Anjikuni is not true.

An American author by the name of Frank Edwards is purported to have started this story in his book Stranger than Science. It has become a popular piece of journalism, repeatedly published and referred to in books and magazines.

There is no evidence however to support such a story. A village with such a large population would not have existed in such a remote area of the Northwest Territories (62 degrees north and 100 degrees west, about 100 km west of Eskimo Point).

Furthermore, the Mounted Police who patrolled the area recorded no untoward events of any kind and neither did local trappers or missionaries.”

October 16, 2010 at 6:32 pm
(9) Scott says:

Even wikipedia has more to add about the Eskimo-Village Disappeared case…
‘The RCMP has since dismissed the case as an urban legend, claiming that the story originated in the book Stranger Than Science by Frank Edwards. The RCMP also states that “It is also believed that such a large village would never have been possible in such a remote area.” (Despite the fact that the aforementioned book the RCMP is using for reference only cites 30 people and one grave.) [3] The RCMP states that it has no records of any unusual activity in the area.[4]

Despite the modern RCMP explanation, an older one can be found from 1931, issued by the RCMP itself after an investigation that the modern RCMP does not acknowledge.[5][6] The 1931 RCMP considered the whole story untrue, although later investigations indicate there may have been some structures that were permanently or seasonally abandoned by the occupants, a normal act which could be confusing to those inexperienced to the area and conditions; it was not sudden and nothing of any real value was left behind. The November 1976 issue of Fate Magazine also studied the story to much the same conclusions’

October 16, 2010 at 6:44 pm
(10) Scott says:

Here’s one that really did happen. Quite strange.
From wikipedia- Dyatlov Pass incident
The Dyatlov Pass incident refers to an event that resulted in the deaths of nine ski hikers in the northern Ural mountains on the night of February 2, 1959. It happened on the east shoulder of the mountain Kholat Syakhl (Холат Сяхл) (a Mansi name, meaning Mountain of the Dead). The mountain pass where the incident occurred has since been named Dyatlov Pass (Перевал Дятлова) after the group’s leader, Igor Dyatlov (Игорь Дятлов).

The lack of eyewitnesses and subsequent investigations into the hikers’ deaths have inspired much speculation. Investigators at the time determined that the hikers tore open their tent from within, departing barefoot in heavy snow. Though the corpses showed no signs of struggle, two victims had fractured skulls, two had broken ribs, and one was missing her tongue.[1] According to sources, four of the victims’ clothing contained substantial levels of radiation. There is no mention of this in contemporary documentation; it only appears in later documents.[1] Soviet investigators determined only that “a compelling unknown force” had caused the deaths. Access to the area was barred for skiers and other adventurers for three years after the incident
Journalists reporting on the available parts of the inquest files claim that it states:

October 16, 2010 at 6:45 pm
(11) Scott says:

Journalists reporting on the available parts of the inquest files claim that it states:

Six of the group members died of hypothermia and three of fatal injuries.
There were no indications of other people nearby apart from the nine travelers on Kholat Syakhl, nor anyone in the surrounding areas.
The tent had been ripped open from within.
The victims had died 6 to 8 hours after their last meal.
Traces from the camp showed that all group members left the camp of their own accord, on foot.
To dispel the theory of an attack by the indigenous Mansi people, one doctor indicated that the fatal injuries of the three bodies could not have been caused by another human being, “because the force of the blows had been too strong and no soft tissue had been damaged”.[1]
Forensic radiation tests had shown high doses of radioactive contamination on the clothes of a few victims.[1]
The final verdict was that the group members all died because of a “compelling unknown force”. The inquest ceased officially in May 1959 due to the “absence of a guilty party”.
Controversy surrounding investigation
Some researchers claim some facts were missed, perhaps ignored, by officials:[2][3]

After the funerals, relatives of the deceased claimed that the skin of the victims had a strange orange tan.[1]
In a private interview, a former investigating officer said that his dosimeter had shown a high radiation level on Kholat Syakhl, and that this was the reason for the radiation found on the bodies. However, the source of the contamination was not found.
Another group of hikers (about 50 kilometers south of the incident) reported that they saw strange orange spheres in the night sky to the north (likely in the direction of Kholat Syakhl) on the night of the incident. Similar “spheres” were observed in Ivdel and adjacent areas continually during the period of February to March 1959, by various independent witnesses (including the meteorology service and the military).[1]

October 16, 2010 at 6:51 pm
(12) Scott says:

sorry about OT, but it’s probably interesting to some

“There was evidence that the team was forced to leave the camp during the night, as they were sleeping. Though the temperature was very low (around −25° to −30°C) with a storm blowing, the dead were dressed only partially. Some of them had only one shoe, while others had no shoes or wore only socks.[1] Some were found wrapped in snips of ripped clothes which seemed to be cut from those who were already dead.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Dyatlov_Pass_incident_02.jpg

October 16, 2010 at 8:22 pm
(13) Scott says:

OT, but hey this keeps em coming back

http://www.sptimes.ru/story/25093

October 18, 2010 at 6:39 am
(14) shirley says:

266 men English territorial battalion 12/8/1915 dissapeared beneath 7 strange clouds..one a large cigar shape whilst fighting the turks..they were never seen again.

What about the mysterious dissaperance of the Dinorsaurs too?

October 18, 2010 at 11:28 pm
(15) Is2012TheDate says:

I ask myself why the scientist don’t have a clue what happened in Machu Pichu, Lambayeque, Tiahuanaco (just few examples) that everybody disappeared without leaving a trace. They try to imagine “logical reasons” as they die hunger, another indian group killed everybody or the “ebola virus” killed them. ????????

December 20, 2010 at 5:40 am
(16) stuart says:

latest update thanks to some one out there ,this could be real.

December 25, 2010 at 6:06 am
(17) jj says:

Nuclear power plant meltdown/the blue is the cobalt burning up/white when the flame gets fed with oxygen.

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